Genophobia, the fear of sexual intercourse explained.

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The fear of sexual intercourse is known as genophobia or coitophobia. People who suffer from this phobia may be afraid of all sex acts or solely of intercourse.

What causes genophobia?

Like all phobias, the main cause is exposure to severe past trauma, especially sexual assaults, abuse or rape. Another possible cause of genophobia is the culture and upbringing and religious teachings that increase the feeling of intense shame and guilt about sex. For some people, even thinking about it can cause discomfort.

Various causes of genophobia might include physical or emotional issues:


1. Vaginismus – When the muscles of the vagina clench up involuntarily when vaginal penetration is attempted. This can make intercourse painful or even impossible. It can also interfere with inserting a tampon. Such severe and consistent pain can lead to a fear of sexual intimacy.

2. Erectile dysfunction – The inability to obtain and maintain an erection is referred to as erectile dysfunction (ED). Despite the fact that it is treatable, it might cause feelings of embarrassment, shame, or stress. Someone with ED might not want to tell another person about it. Depending on the intensity of the feelings, a person may develop a fear of sexual intimacy.

3. Past sexual abuse or PTSD – Sexual or physical abuse of children is a serious problem. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has an impact on how people perceive intimacy and sex. It can also have an impact on sexual functioning. While not every abuse survivor develops PTSD or a fear of sex or intimacy, these factors may play a role in some people’s fear of sex.

4. Fear of sexual performance – Some people are nervous about whether they’re “good” in bed. This can cause intense psychological discomfort. Many people, especially those with limited sexual experience, worry that they will be unable to satisfy their partners. These concerns might be mild and self-limiting in nature, but they can also be severe. Performance anxiety can sometimes turn into genophobia.

5. Body shame or body dysmorphia – Shame of one’s body, as well as being overly self-conscious about the body, can negatively impact sexual satisfaction and cause anxiety. Some individuals with severe body shame or dysmorphia (seeing the body as flawed although, to other people, it looks normal) may avoid or fear sexual intimacy altogether because of the lack of pleasure and intense shame it brings them.

6. Nosophobia – Sexual intercourse increases the chance of acquiring a variety of diseases, including HIV. Most people may successfully balance this risk by using safeguards such as condoms, monogamy, and STD testing to reduce it to a level that is personally acceptable. But if you are someone who suffers from nosophobia: fear of getting a disease or virus then you may feel sex is dangerous and never risk your health.

7. A history of rape – Rape or sexual assault can result in PTSD as well as a variety of sexual dysfunctions, including negative sex associations. Someone may acquire a fear of sexual intimacy as a result of this. The difference between a mild fear and a phobia is that a phobia has a negative impact on your life, affecting it in significant ways. Fear of sex can interfere with developing romantic relationships. It can also contribute to feelings of isolation and depression.

A person’s overall fear or anxiety about being emotionally close to another person may also translate into a fear of sexual intimacy. Phobias involve a more marked reaction than simply not liking or being afraid of something.

How to treat genophobia?

Depending on the situation, phobias can be treated with therapy and/or medication. A doctor can examine you to see if your fear of sex has a physical component, and if so, treat it. If there is no underlying physical cause for your phobia, your doctor can assist you with resources and recommendations to phobia-specific therapists. This is a curable condition. It’s not something you have to deal with on your own.

If a physical component, such as vaginismus, is present, it can be identified and addressed. Intercourse pain is very common. If left untreated, it can evolve to a fear of sexual intercourse. If a physical cause is identified, treatment depends on the specific issue, and then any accompanying emotional component can be addressed.

A sex therapist can also be helpful for addressing genophobia.

There are other phobias related to genophobia that might occur at the same time:

 Nosophobia – Fear of getting a disease or virus
 Gymnophobia – Fear of nudity ( seeing others naked,
being seen naked or both )
 Heterophobia – Fear of the opposite sex
 Haphephobia – Fear of being touched as well as
touching others
 Coitophobia – Fear of sexual intercourse
 Tocophobia – Fear of pregnancy or child birth

Sex is a basic need for a human body, if you have decided to be asexual without any fear of sex then it; is fine, but if you fear sex or intimacy then you should go to a professional and get it treated.

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